Maach … Maaga … Maaji Kakao

maach  v. march. Yu aalwayz si pipl di maach wid kraas pahn Gud 
                Fraideh.
You always see people marching with crosses on Good Friday.
 

maachin aami aans  n. a type of forest ant which moves in columns. 
                Nat eevn wan blayd a graas mi lef afta di maachin aami aans dehn
                paas chroo di yaad.
Not even one blade of grass was left after the
                marching army ants passed through the yard.
 

maaga  adj. skinny, thin. Sari fi maaga daag, maaga daag ton rong ahn 
              bait yu.
If you feel sorry for a skinny dog, it will turn around and bite you.
             (Kriol proverb similar to the saying in English ‘it will bite the hand that
              feeds it’.) See: snaipi, tin.

 

maaga seezn  n.phr. 1) dry, calm, hot season in August. Joorin maaga
            seezn ih noh rayn ataal.
During the hot season it doesn’t rain at all.
            2) Dog Days; season of hard economic times. Afta Krismos da maaga
            seezn kaa nobadi noh ga no moni.
After Christmas is a hard time because
            nobody has any money.  [<Scottish ‘meagre’]
 

maajareen  n. margarine. Sohn kuk laik yooz maajareen moa dan bota. 
            Some cooks like to use margarine more than butter.
 

maaji kakao  n. species of hardwood tree that is often planted as fence 
            posts; flowers are eaten as a vegetable; bark and leaves are used in 
            medicines. Gliricidia sepium.  [<Sp. ‘madre de cacao’ mother of the cacao;
            planted to shade and nourish the cacao trees on plantations]

 

Fahn di Kriol-Inglish dikshineri:  https://www.sil.org/resources/archives/10602

Silvaana Udz, Ed.D da fahn Bileez. If yu waahn tel shee bowt sohnting speshal fu put eena dis Kriol
aatikl, eemayl: sudz142@gmail.com           Vizit: www.nationalkriolcouncil.org



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Kriol is the language spoken by many Belizeans, especially the Creole people of Belize. Although it is often perceived as a dialect of English, it is indeed it's own language with grammar and spelling rules. The National Kriol Council of Belize was created to promote the culture and language of the Kriol people of Belize, as well as harmony among all the ethnic groups of Belize. Please visit the website of the National Kriol Council of Belize for lots of good information about the Kriol language and the Creole people.


The Kriol Council has been kind enough to send us the weekly "Weh Wi Ga Fi Seh" column that is usually published in the Reporter.


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